WAKE UP! Bellman Analog Vibrating Alarm Clock from Harris Communications Deaf, Hard of Hearing, or Just Hard to Wake Up?

Bellman Analog Vibrating Alarm Clock:

Quick Overview – “Link Here”

The Bellman Analog Alarm clock with bed shaker is an excellent product for people who like to have a very clear wake up signal in the morning.

 •Wake up by flashing light on the clock, vibration or acoustic ring signal which grows louder and sweeps through different sound frequencies during the alarm.

•Bed shaker included.

•4 minute snooze and 15 minute alarm time.

•Clock lights up during the alarm or when you press the snooze button.

•Battery backup keeps the clock powered even if there’s a blackout while you sleep.

Details:

 The Bellman Alarm clock is an excellent product for people who like to have a very clear wake up signal in the morning. Awaken by flash lights, vibration and an acoustic ring signal which grows louder and sweeps through different sound frequencies during the alarm. With the purchase of an additional bed shaker, the Analog Alarm Clock can power two bed-shakers placed under the pillow, that generates a clear vibration during the alarm. The Bellman Alarm clock can further be connected to the telephone and provide a clear alarm upon incoming telephone calls.

 The Bellman Alarm clock has a snooze-function, which means that the alarm function in the clock is activated again after 4 minutes. To facilitate reading the time, the clock face lights up during the alarm, or when pressing the snooze button. For safety reasons, internal back-up batteries power the clock during power failure.

Features: •80dBA audible alarm grows louder and sweeps through different sound frequencies during the alarm

•Flashing light

•Vibration alert with the bed shaker attachment (included)

•Battery backup in the event of a power outage

•4 minute snooze

Seeking Program Coordinator, ASL Sign Language Interpreters, and More at Aspen Camp

CITY: Snowmass, Colorado

WEBSITE: http://www.aspencamp.org/about/careers

Want to work at a fun place between beautiful mountains and creeks? Love people and making magic happen? Want to put your leadership, organizational, and creative skills to use for a good cause?

Aspen Camp of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing are seeking to fill several job openings:

– 1 Program Coordinator. Full time team member who coordinates programs and events at Aspen Camp and manages seasonal staff. Salaried pay and must live on campus during programs and can live off campus during off-sesaons.

– 1 Office Intern: Internship from Jan 3 to April 24, 2013 to help with office work, programs, outreach, and advocacy.

– 1 Kitchen Intern: Internship from Jan 3 to April 24, 2013 to help with menu planning, food and equipment management, and meal preparation for programs and events. Stipend weekly with room and other perks.

– 2 ASL Interpreter Interns: Internships from Jan 3 to April 24, 2013 to interpret local events, programs, and meetings. Stipend or college hours negotiable with room and other perks.

For job descriptions, requirements, and benefits, check out

http://www.aspencamp.org/about/careers. Also apply at that link.

Email outreach @ aspencamp.org or call (970) 315-0513 if you have any questions.

CONTACT PERSON NAME: Katie Murch

CONTACT EMAIL ADDRESS: outreach@aspencamp.org

CONTACT TELEPHONE #: 970-315-0513

When worlds collide: the Deaf perspective | Communication Issue part 1

An informative discusion from blogger – “When worlds collide: the Deaf perspective”

 

To join the conversation go to this link:  >>  Communication Issue part 1

 

I had a conversation with a friend the other day.  She had mentioned that her partner was complaining about why some hearing people would say that Deaf people forget things all the time.    This is a perfect example.    When hearing people talk to us without sign language or making effort to make sure we’re “listening” as in lip-reading.    If there’s no clear communication such as in sign language, effort in lip-reading or writing notes ; there are going to be some confusion.  I’ve run into this a few times. It isn’t that we forget – it is because we didn’t understand what was being delivered.    For some of Deaf people who relies a lot on lip-reading as I do, sometime after so long of trying to focus on lip-reading, it drains us.  Hence, the confusion.

When worlds collide: the Deaf perspective

I had a conversation with a friend the other day.  She had mentioned that her partner was complaining about why some hearing people would say that Deaf people forget things all the time.    This is a perfect example.    When hearing people talk to us without sign language or making effort to make sure we’re “listening” as in lip-reading.    If there’s no clear communication such as in sign language, effort in lip-reading or writing notes ; there are going to be some confusion.  I’ve run into this a few times. It isn’t that we forget – it is because we didn’t understand what was being delivered.    For some of Deaf people who relies a lot on lip-reading as I do, sometime after so long of trying to focus on lip-reading, it drains us.  Hence, the confusion.

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