WAKE UP! Bellman Analog Vibrating Alarm Clock from Harris Communications Deaf, Hard of Hearing, or Just Hard to Wake Up?

Bellman Analog Vibrating Alarm Clock:

Quick Overview – “Link Here”

The Bellman Analog Alarm clock with bed shaker is an excellent product for people who like to have a very clear wake up signal in the morning.

 •Wake up by flashing light on the clock, vibration or acoustic ring signal which grows louder and sweeps through different sound frequencies during the alarm.

•Bed shaker included.

•4 minute snooze and 15 minute alarm time.

•Clock lights up during the alarm or when you press the snooze button.

•Battery backup keeps the clock powered even if there’s a blackout while you sleep.

Details:

 The Bellman Alarm clock is an excellent product for people who like to have a very clear wake up signal in the morning. Awaken by flash lights, vibration and an acoustic ring signal which grows louder and sweeps through different sound frequencies during the alarm. With the purchase of an additional bed shaker, the Analog Alarm Clock can power two bed-shakers placed under the pillow, that generates a clear vibration during the alarm. The Bellman Alarm clock can further be connected to the telephone and provide a clear alarm upon incoming telephone calls.

 The Bellman Alarm clock has a snooze-function, which means that the alarm function in the clock is activated again after 4 minutes. To facilitate reading the time, the clock face lights up during the alarm, or when pressing the snooze button. For safety reasons, internal back-up batteries power the clock during power failure.

Features: •80dBA audible alarm grows louder and sweeps through different sound frequencies during the alarm

•Flashing light

•Vibration alert with the bed shaker attachment (included)

•Battery backup in the event of a power outage

•4 minute snooze

Seeking Program Coordinator, ASL Sign Language Interpreters, and More at Aspen Camp

CITY: Snowmass, Colorado

WEBSITE: http://www.aspencamp.org/about/careers

Want to work at a fun place between beautiful mountains and creeks? Love people and making magic happen? Want to put your leadership, organizational, and creative skills to use for a good cause?

Aspen Camp of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing are seeking to fill several job openings:

– 1 Program Coordinator. Full time team member who coordinates programs and events at Aspen Camp and manages seasonal staff. Salaried pay and must live on campus during programs and can live off campus during off-sesaons.

– 1 Office Intern: Internship from Jan 3 to April 24, 2013 to help with office work, programs, outreach, and advocacy.

– 1 Kitchen Intern: Internship from Jan 3 to April 24, 2013 to help with menu planning, food and equipment management, and meal preparation for programs and events. Stipend weekly with room and other perks.

– 2 ASL Interpreter Interns: Internships from Jan 3 to April 24, 2013 to interpret local events, programs, and meetings. Stipend or college hours negotiable with room and other perks.

For job descriptions, requirements, and benefits, check out

http://www.aspencamp.org/about/careers. Also apply at that link.

Email outreach @ aspencamp.org or call (970) 315-0513 if you have any questions.

CONTACT PERSON NAME: Katie Murch

CONTACT EMAIL ADDRESS: outreach@aspencamp.org

CONTACT TELEPHONE #: 970-315-0513

When worlds collide: the Deaf perspective | Communication Issue part 1

An informative discusion from blogger – “When worlds collide: the Deaf perspective”

 

To join the conversation go to this link:  >>  Communication Issue part 1

 

I had a conversation with a friend the other day.  She had mentioned that her partner was complaining about why some hearing people would say that Deaf people forget things all the time.    This is a perfect example.    When hearing people talk to us without sign language or making effort to make sure we’re “listening” as in lip-reading.    If there’s no clear communication such as in sign language, effort in lip-reading or writing notes ; there are going to be some confusion.  I’ve run into this a few times. It isn’t that we forget – it is because we didn’t understand what was being delivered.    For some of Deaf people who relies a lot on lip-reading as I do, sometime after so long of trying to focus on lip-reading, it drains us.  Hence, the confusion.

When worlds collide: the Deaf perspective

I had a conversation with a friend the other day.  She had mentioned that her partner was complaining about why some hearing people would say that Deaf people forget things all the time.    This is a perfect example.    When hearing people talk to us without sign language or making effort to make sure we’re “listening” as in lip-reading.    If there’s no clear communication such as in sign language, effort in lip-reading or writing notes ; there are going to be some confusion.  I’ve run into this a few times. It isn’t that we forget – it is because we didn’t understand what was being delivered.    For some of Deaf people who relies a lot on lip-reading as I do, sometime after so long of trying to focus on lip-reading, it drains us.  Hence, the confusion.

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Sign Language Users Read Body Language Better | Lexington School | Center For The Deaf

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deaf people who use sign language are quicker at recognizing and interpreting body language than hearing non-signers, according to new research from investigators at UC Davis and UC Irvine.

The work suggests that deaf people may be especially adept at picking up on subtle visual traits in the actions of others, an ability that could be useful for some sensitive jobs, such as airport screening.

“There are a lot of anecdotes about deaf people being better able to pick up on body language, but this is the first evidence of that,” said David Corina, professor in the UC Davis Department of Linguistics and Center for Mind and Brain.

Corina and graduate student Michael Grosvald, now a postdoctoral researcher at UC Irvine, measured the response times of both deaf and hearing people to a series of video clips showing people making American Sign Language signs or “non-language” gestures, such as stroking the chin. Their work was published online Dec. 6 in the journal Cognition.

“We expected that deaf people would recognize sign language faster than hearing people, as the deaf people know and use sign language daily, but the real surprise was that deaf people also were about 100 milliseconds faster at recognizing non-language gestures than were hearing people,” Corina said.

This work is important because it suggests that the human ability for communication is modifiable and is not limited to speech, Corina said. Deaf individuals show us that language can be expressed by the hands and be perceived through the visual system. When this happens, deaf signers get the added benefit of being able to recognize non-language actions better than hearing people who do not know a sign language, Corina said.

The study supports the idea that sign language is based on a modification of the system that all humans use to recognize gestures and body language, rather than working through a completely different system, Corina said.

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation.

Deaf Awareness – A Perspective from Life in UNISEL – Deaf Art by Chuck Baird

Deaf Awareness.

Helen Keller, a deaf-blind American author, once said; “I have always thought it would be a blessing if each person could be blind and deaf for a few days during his early adult life. Darkness would make him appreciate sight; silence would teach him the joys of sound.” Have you ever thought of the possibility of going deaf in one ear or both? How would it affect your lifestyle and the way others treated you?

In a survey done by the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) in 2008, Malaysia was reported to have 29,522 Deaf people. However, this number probably does not include those with partial or mild hearing loss.

In June, I attended a beginner’s class in sign language organized by the Young Men’s Christian Association Kuala Lumpur (YMCA KL). From my research and interaction with the Deaf community, I have found that there still remains a general ambiguity and uncertainty on how to deal with the Deaf. Today, I will expose you to the different terms related to deafness, common misconceptions about deafness and tips on one-on one communication with a deaf person. Let’s begin by examining a few terms related to deafness.

Now, what are the differences between the terms Deaf (with a capital “D”), deaf (the “d” is lowercase), hard of hearing, and hearing impaired?

“Deaf” refers to the members of the Deaf community who share common values, norms, traditions, language and behaviors. Deaf people do not think of themselves as handicapped, impaired or disabled. They have their own unique culture and language, just like the rest of Malaysian society.

Deaf and hard of hearing people have the right to choose what they wish to be called. Overwhelmingly, they prefer to use the specific terms ‘deaf’ and ‘hard of hearing’.

The term ‘deaf’ and ‘hard of hearing’ encompasses many groups of people, most of who do not identify themselves as part of the Deaf culture. Some may know sign language but their primary language is the spoken language e.g. English or Malay. They usually have mild, moderate or severe hearing loss but choose to associate mainly with hearing people.

The term ‘hearing impaired’ is considered offensive to the deaf because it implies that they are not up to the ‘hearing’ society’s standard. Deaf people believe that there is nothing wrong with them, and their culture, language and society are just as important as the ones experienced by the mainstream society. Just as ‘deaf-mute’ and ‘deaf and dumb’ are offensive labels, ‘hearing impaired’ is an outdated way to label people with any level of hearing loss. Unfortunately, the mainstream Malaysian media still uses this term due to their ignorance.

What are the common misconceptions about deafness? From a survey done with my classmates, I have found quite a few mistaken beliefs regarding the Deaf.

Firstly, not all deaf people can lip read as it is a difficult skill to master. Moreover, only about 26-30% of speech is visible on the lips, and even the best lip readers can’t interpret everything that is being said.

Second, deaf persons are not ‘mute’ as they have normal vocal organs. Some prefer not to use their voices due to shyness or worry that they have inappropriate pitch and volume.

Eight out of twelve of  you believe that deaf people are not distracted when they work in a noisy environment. This is not true as most deaf persons still have some hearing left and they might be sensitive to sounds and vibrations, especially when they have their hearing aids on.

The fourth misconception is, hearing aids and cochlear implants restore hearing to normal. I’d like to stress that putting on hearing aids is not the same as wearing glasses. Hearing aids and cochlear implants benefit each deaf person based on the severity of their hearing loss. Some individuals will gain almost normal hearing while others might only be able to hear environmental or background sounds.

Now that you are aware of the misconceptions about deafness, I would like to share with you tips on one-one communication with a deaf person.

It is important to look directly at the person while speaking. Even a slight turn of the head can obscure the deaf person’s vision. Next, speak slowly and clearly; you don’t have to exaggerate your pronunciation of words as this makes lip reading more difficult. A deaf person is most likely to understand when the speaker faces him, and speaks in a clear voice, slightly slower than usual but with normal rhythm, so that the deaf person can both hear and see the speaker.

Life in UNISEL - 'I Love You' in Sign Language

Pantomime, body language and facial expressions are important factors in communication. Be sure to use all of them. For example, an upward movement of the eyebrows indicates a question.

In addition, Deaf people listen with their eyes. Eye contact helps to convey the feeling of direct communication. From the Deaf perspective, the lack of eye contact shows indifference.

Finally, don’t be embarrassed about communication via pen and paper. It’s okay to write to a Deaf person, and they will appreciate the effort. This is what I usually did in sign language class if I had lost all means to communicate with my teacher.

In review, we now know that “Deaf”, deaf, hard of hearing and hearing impaired all have different meanings. We also know tips on communicating with a deaf person. So, the next time you encounter a deaf person, I’ll hope you’ll remember what you’ve learned and treat the Deaf with the respect they deserve. As Gil Eastman; a former Gallaudet Theatre Art Professor stated; “It is interesting to see that deaf people can function in the hearing world very well while hearing people can’t function well in the deaf world.”

 

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